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Research impact services

Why Measure Research Impact?
Measuring how your research impacts a field or discipline and how it impacts the world around you can:
  • Help support your application for tenure or promotion
  • Strengthen a research grant application
  • Identify how your research is being used
  • Connect you with potential collaborators
Read more about evaluating your research impact on our Research Impact LibGuide.
For help evaluating your research impact, contact the Math Library.

Contact us

Mathematical Sciences Library

Location

40 St George Street, Rm 6141
Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1A1
416-978-8624
math.library@utoronto.ca

Hours

U of T Departments

News

Workshops

Date: Monday, January 21, 2019
Time: 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Location: E.J. Pratt Library
Campus: St. George (Downtown) Campus

Research and Writing Seminars: Develop Your Scholarly Voice. Each session in this suite of four interactive seminars integrates the learning of academic research and writing skills and is taught by a librarian in collaboration with a writing instructor. The goal of each seminar is to help you develop your own voice as an emerging scholar by enabling you to identify, situate and substantiate your arguments in the context of the scholarly discussion taking place in your discipline. The seminars are designed for humanities and social sciences undergraduate students. Graduate students might wish to consider the research-related skills offerings in the Graduate Professional Skills Program.

Take any three (3) of the four (4) seminars to earn credit on your Co-Curricular Record.

Critical Reading

Learn how to develop critical reading skills and how to incorporate them into the process of research and critical writing. This session concentrates on the skills of analysis and synthesis as they pertain to library research and academic writing. Through short lectures, interactive class discussion and hands-on exercises, you will learn to:

  • Describe the scholarly communication process, including the peer review process
  • Conduct university-level library research and understand the basics of the argumentative essay
  • Identify different types of sources and understand their role in your research process
  • Read strategically to select the best sources and recognize their most important part(s).
  • Employ criteria to evaluate sources for scope, authority and bias

Key terms for this session: Peer review, 3-D Reading, Bloom’s Taxonomy, primary & secondary sources.

Location: E.J. Pratt Library, E-Classroom (room 306) Directions

Other seminars in this series include:

  • Writing to Cite
  • Annotated Bibliographies
  • Literature Reviews
Date: Tuesday, January 22, 2019
Time: 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Presenter: Information Commons
Location: Robarts Library
Campus: St. George (Downtown) Campus

Learn how to safely operate the LulzBot TAZ 6 3D printers. You must complete this safety training session before you can use our 3D printers. You must also pass our 3D printing knowledge test.

 

Date: Tuesday, January 22, 2019
Time: 2:10pm - 3:00pm
Location: Gerstein Library
Campus: St. George (Downtown) Campus

Learn how to safely operate the Makerbot Replicator 2 3D printers. You must complete this safety training session before you can use our 3D printers.

3D Printing Safety Training

Date: Tuesday, January 22 2:10pm - 3:00pm

Location: MADLab, Gerstein Science Information Centre, 1 Below, room B112

Presenters: Erica Lenton, Gerstein Librarian & Mike Spears, MADLab Manager

What's Covered: 

- overview of 3D Printing @ Gerstein + MADLab policies & guidelines for use

- instructions for safe & effective use of the 3D printers

- how to prepare a 3D design file for printing 

- basic design principles

Questions?

Send your questions to gerstein.3Dprinting@utoronto.ca or visit our website at: http://guides.library.utoronto.ca/3dprinting

Date: Tuesday, January 22, 2019
Time: 4:10pm - 5:30pm
Location: Robarts Library

Misinformation, disinformation, bias, propaganda, “fake news,” bots, algorithms, “post-truth,” “alternative facts,” information pollution, memes, clickbait, echo chambers, filter bubbles, information overload...

How can we more skillfully navigate the news in today’s messy and confusing information environment?

This interactive workshop will ask participants to reflect on their own news practices. We’ll look at the various types of news content and some of the problems that can creep in. And we’ll introduce a critical thinking skills framework through which to evaluate the news around us.

LOCATION: Robarts LIbrary, 4th-floor conference room. Go to the top of the escalators and follow the signs.

 

 

From our collection

Genius at play : the curious mind of John Horton Conway /
How Euler did even more /
Refractions of mathematics education : festschrift for Eva Jablonka /
Probabilities : the little numbers that rule our lives /